Statera Member Spotlight: Sarah McCarroll

StateraArts members come from all over the USA and all genres of art-making. They are educators, arts leaders, activists, content-creators, professional artists, early career, mid-career, patrons, and community organizers. The Statera Member Spotlight is just one way StateraArts uplifts and amplifies the voices of our members. Today, we’d like to introduce you to Sarah McCarroll.

sarahmccaroll.jpg

StateraArts: What is your occupation or calling in the arts?
Sarah McCarroll:
Like many artists (and educators), I wear many hats. Teacher, designer, scholar; they’re all part of the mix, and each part informs and strengthens the others. If you make me pin it down, I suppose I think of myself as a scholar-practitioner, where my practice of costume design and technology is informed by my scholarship of period dress, embodiment, and Victorian theatre, and vice versa.

SA: What organizations are you affiliated with?
SM:
I am an Associate Professor of Theatre at Georgia Southern University. I teach courses in Script Analysis and Theatre History, but I’m also the resident costume designer and costume shop director, so I teach Costume Design, too. Professionally, my home has been the Utah Shakespeare Festival, where I spent more than a decade of summers as a first hand and wardrobe supervisor.

SA: What inspires your work most?
SM:
Verbs. Stephen Fry once said something about how he’s not an actor, he acts; he’s not a writer, he writes. These are actions we undertake, not static nouns that we are. And for me, what’s packed into the idea of a verb is the potential for change, and growth, and progression; movement and motion. I teach, but I’m not one thing as a teacher; I learn from my students, I get better, I find new ways to talk about my craft and its history. I write, and when I’m actively engaged in writing, I’m creating a new intellectual space with my words and ideas. When things get crazy, it’s easy to feel as though we are being tossed around by all the forces at work in our lives, and the reminder to myself that I have to verb through my days gives me a sense of my own agency and active presence in the world.

What do you love most about your artistic community?
Its breadth and depth. It may just be via social media, but my artistic community has outposts all over the country, and knowing that those people delight in my work, and allow me to delight in theirs makes the space I inhabit feel much larger than the small town I actually live in.

Why did you become a StateraArts member?
I became a Statera member because I believe in Statera’s mission, most particularly as it relates to the experiences I hope my students will have as they become part of the professional artistic community. Statera is one of the reasons that my students’ paths and possibilities will be broader; there will be more spaces open to them because of the work that we all do with Statera. We are each other’s network, safety net, and  mentors. We keep each other honest and we celebrate the victories of each of us as the victories of us all.

Any upcoming projects you'd like to share with us? 
I’m working on a book manuscript theorizing stage costumes as vehicles of memory. Costumes hold memories of the bodies of the actors who have worn them, in their sweat stains, the strains of their seams, the bare patches on elbows and knees; and I think that gives us a way to think about how we might, here and there, visit with the ghosts of vanished performances. Costumes also convey social memories onto the bodies of actors; garments hold cultural ideas about how the body should move and behave. By looking at both of these kinds of memory, I want to explore how audiences experience and understand the costumed actor.

Tell us about another woman or non-binary artist who inspires your work. 
I am inspired by the work of Dr. Amy Cook, who studies cognitive science and performance. Her most recent book, Building Character: The Art and Science of Casting, examines the ways in which we use mental images to structure the ways in which we “cast” people, on stage, certainly, but also in everyday life. What happens if we break open those categories of casting? What happens if we reimagine King Lear as a woman? Well, Glenda Jackson happens. And we learn new things about the character, the play, and the world by opening the door to new ideas about who can fit into particular roles.

 Amy was my dissertation advisor. Perhaps the most important lesson she offered me was, “make the world into the image you want it to have.” She helped me believe that an academic world in which I got to do both of the things I love – history and costumes – could exist, if I worked to shape the space I wanted to fill.

What does gender parity in the arts look like to you?
For me, gender parity would mean that when my students become the generation “in charge” of things, the industry would actually look like the classrooms I walk into every day, with at least 50% women+. (This is, of course, also about racial parity. My classrooms are also roughly one third non-white.) Gender parity will mean that we don’t allow women and non-binary artists to fall out of the pipelines to leadership. Instead, we demand that they be given space in those pipelines; we begin to empower and advance women+ and POC at the earliest possible points in their artistic lives, so that they believe those leaderships spaces are obvious and available career choices.

Mentorship is at the core of the StateraArts mission. Tell us about one of your mentors. How did they shape you or provide pathways for opportunity?
This sounds so cliché, but can I say my mother? Her name is Dr. Roberta Rankin. In her professional life, she was a director and professor; she used to say to her students, “I get drunk on the sounds of the words we get to speak onstage.” I learned that intoxication from her. She was also a single parent, although my father was very much a part of my life, and she modeled the strength and the struggle of trying to carry so many identities at once – mother, teacher, director, etc. My mother is my first, greatest, and ongoing mentor. She taught me how to take a play apart to see what makes it tick, she encourages my whimsy, and she shows me how to tackle life’s challenges with grit and humor.

Stay tuned for a follow up article by Sarah McCarroll about creating resilient classrooms that provide students with creative space to fail and grow.


Sarah McCarroll is an associate professor of theatre at Georgia Southern University, where she teaches courses in theatre history and script analysis, and is also the resident costume designer and shop manager. She has recently completed a term as editor of the journal Theatre Symposium, with volumes on Theatrical Costume, and Theatre and Embodiment. Her published work also appears in Theatre, Performance and Cognition: Languages, Bodies and Ecologies, and she is currently at work on a book theorizing stage costumes as vehicles of embodied memory. Sarah’s professional home is the Utah Shakespeare Festival, where she has served as first hand, wardrobe supervisor, and dramaturg. She holds a PhD from Indiana University and an MFA from the University of Alabama.

Statera is on Break from September 7-15

Screen Shot 2019-08-28 at 11.18.57 PM.png

Statera is going on vacation! We're taking a cue from our own vision statement -- Statera normalizes a humane and holistic creative environment that nourishes innovation -- and taking a week-long break. We love our team and they need some down-time before starting final preparations for conference! We'll be back in the office on September 15th!

While we're gone, you can still make use of our website:

Register for conference >>>

Submit your membership application >>>

Subscribe to the Statera Newsletter >>>

Consult our free resource directories >>>

Make a donation to StateraArts >>>

Statera Moves Into New Office Headquarters

StateraArts is an organization with international reach, but its roots are in Cedar City, Utah. Executive Director Melinda Pfundstein conceived of and co-founded StateraArts in Southern Utah and Cedar City was the location of Statera’s inaugural conference in 2015. So its fitting that Statera has chosen the downtown arts district of Cedar City as the location for their new offices.

StateraArts team members in front of the new office. From left to right: Sarah Greenman, Melinda Pfundstein, Sabrina Cofield, and Kate St. Pierre.

StateraArts team members in front of the new office. From left to right: Sarah Greenman, Melinda Pfundstein, Sabrina Cofield, and Kate St. Pierre.

StateraArts Cedar City office.

StateraArts Cedar City office.

“We have dreamt of a brick and mortar space since our founding,” says Executive Director Melinda Pfundstein. “This location is alive with the creative spark, be it art, great food, good wine, and the bustle and energy of people connecting around all of it.”

In an effort to create community and connect with local artisans, Statera has opened their offices for special collaborations with Art Works Gallery and Red Acre Farm, a local women-led organic farm and CSA in Cedar City.

Pfundstein says, “We are so lucky to have Red Acre Farm feature Pop Up Cafe’s in our space every Thursday and during Final Friday Art Walks. And our walls are lined with rotating pieces by women artists, provided by Art Works Gallery next door. We are absolutely surrounded by innovation and beauty, and already feel right at home.”

Statera’s new neighbors also include Artisans Gallery, Utah Shakespeare Festival, Southern Utah Museum of Art, Park Place Eatery, The French Spot, The Grind Coffee House, Centro Woodfired Pizza, Pastry Pub, IG Winery, the Cedar City Arts Council, Cedar’s red mountain, and more.


Are you in Cedar City today?
Join us for lunch from 11am - 1:30pm for the Red Acre Farm Pop-Up Cafe!
18 N. 100 W | Cedar City, UT

1-3.jpg
1-2.jpg
IMG_3248.jpg
IMG_3251.jpg

Statera Member Spotlight: Michaela Goldhaber

StateraArts members come from all over the USA and all genres of art-making. They are educators, arts leaders, activists, content-creators, professional artists, early career, mid-career, patrons, and community organizers. The Statera Member Spotlight is just one way StateraArts uplifts and amplifies the voices of our members. Today, we’d like to introduce you to Michaela (Mickey) Goldhaber.

Mickey Headshot 2.jpg


StateraArts: What is your occupation or calling in the arts?
Michaela Goldhaber:
I’m a playwright and director. Most of my career has been as a director, but I always wrote. I had a stroke 11 years ago, and at that point I decided I needed to move back to the Bay Area. Part of my mom's pitch at the time for getting me back home was saying, “Hey, you can finally write that play you’ve been talking about for so long!” I had been working on my play The Lady Scribblers for years. Once I got settled in back in California, I started taking classes at Berkeley Rep, and then joined the Central Works Theatre Company's writers group. I was a member there for 3 years, and that's how I finally finished the play!  

SA: What organizations are you affiliated with?
MG:
I am the Artistic Director for Wry Crips Disabled Women’s Theatre Group, the Lead Instigator of Bay Area Women's Theatre Festival, and a Dramatist Guild member. One interesting aspect of my life is my partner Chris Hall is the leader of a group called Godless Perverts, which is a social justice activist group that presents and promotes a positive view of sexuality without religion. So I am also a proud Godless Pervert!

SA: Tell us about your favorite project you've done thus far.
MG:
Well, when I was living in New York my friend Heather Ondersma and I had a company called Flying Fig Theater, with our mission being to tell women’s stories onstage through new works and by rediscovering women playwrights of the past. I’m particularly interested in the female playwrights of the restoration. My favorite play is The Wonder! A Woman Keeps a Secret by Susanna Centlivre. I directed it as my thesis in grad school at UCLA and then in New York with my company. Working on that play has brought me great joy and I'm sure I will continue to work on it throughout my career. Another favorite project was the first show I directed after my stroke, which was Bedtime in Detroit at Boxcar Theatre. It was a really exciting project, but at first I wasn’t sure how I would be as a director after so many changes had happened to my body. Through that process I found out I could still direct and continue to connect deeply with actors. This discovery was thrilling.  

SA: What inspires your work most? 
MG: Telling women's stories. That's what matters most to me. My work is fueled by making room for women and people with disabilities on the stage.  

SA: Why did you become a STATERA member?
MG:
Because of Martha Richards!! I was so excited and happy for Martha when I learned that StateraArts took on SWAN Day. Once that was part of Statera, I HAD to become involved, because I have been part of SWAN Day for years now and it means so much to me. It was SWAN day that formed the core of the Bay Area Women's Theatre Festival. I was part of a Women’s Theatre Festival in North Carolina last year when we did a reading of The Lady Scribblers. I was feeling so inspired afterwords that I hopped on a Facebook group I belong to called “'Yeah I said Feminist' A Theatre Salon” and I asked, “Hey who wants to help me start a women's theatre festival in the Bay Area? Within 20 mins we had the first meeting set up. A team of 15 women instantly came together to make it happen. We now have 40 participating theatre companies in the Bay Area. We will also be part of a panel at StateraCon this October, and I can't wait!

 SA: Any upcoming projects you'd like to share with us? 
MG:
I have two that I'd love to share! Wry Crips Occupy! is a new piece about the 504 sit in in 1977 when disabled activists took over the federal building in San Francisco in order to push the issuance of long-delayed regulations regarding Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. We are giving our first performance of it this week; a staged reading at the Ed Roberts Campus in Berkeley. It's a really neat building where the major disability organizations operate out of. We'll be performing in the atrium there. It has this beautiful bright red swirling ramp going all the way down that will make for a perfect backdrop. Following the reading, we are taking the show to ACT’s Costume Shop Theatre along with Regan Linton, Artistic Director of Phamaly Theatre. Our show will be performed alongside her piece, FDR Drag Show, for three public performances. It's going to be an action packed event! Then in the spring, my play The Lady Scribblers will have its world premiere March 6th-29th at Custom Made Theatre Company as part of the Bay Area Women’s Theatre Festival, which will run from March 1 to May 31, 2020

SA: What does gender parity in the arts look like to you?
MG:
For me, I think it's important to start with women's stories. It’s not just about the numbers. I want to see more stories that highlight women’s achievements and women in history. My particular interest is in digging in to the history of a certain era and then asking myself, "What were the women doing then?" So often everything we learn in history is always about the men of the times. A world of theatre where women’s stories are as important as men's stories is a world of parity, to me. The ground rules for the Women’s Theatre Festival is that is that every production has to be written and directed by a woman or non-binary artist and the cast and design team have to have gender parity. We’ve had to be very strict about that. But we were clear from the get-go that this is what we are looking for. We reached out to theatres in the area and said, "As you are planning your next season, is there a play you’re looking at doing that was written by a woman? If not, may we recommend one to you?" Then I'm also looking at where the people with disabilities are and how we can build more representation for us as well. 

SA: Mentorship is at the core of the STATERA mission. Tell us about one of your mentors. How did they shape you or provide pathways for opportunity?
MJ:
My greatest mentor in the theatre was Barbara Oliver, an actor and director here in Bay Area. When she reached a certain age and wasn’t being cast in roles that interested her anymore, she founded Aurora Theatre Company, which is a really a thriving theatre here that does fantastic work. She commissioned a playwright friend to write a piece and because she knew everyone in the Bay Area she was able to assemble a top cast. I had just finished college and was assistant directing at California Shakespeare Festival and she took me on as her Assistant Director. She was my champion and friend and mentor and was completely indefatigable. She worked in the theatre right up until her death, working on a tour in her 80s, and still directing at 85! She inspired me so much. She really knew what she wanted in all aspects of her career and was so kind and generous to everyone she met. At her memorial service at the Berkley Rep, a  woman maybe 10 years younger than me stood up and talked about how Barbara was her mentor, and what she shared was so similar to my story that for a minute I felt like, “Hey, I thought I was her mentee!” Then of course I realized, "Wow. How powerful it is that she was able to have this relationship with so many people and we all benefited so much and felt so special.” She completely shaped my early career. 


Interested in becoming a member of StateraArts?
Learn more at www.stateraarts.org/membership.

Families Welcome at Statera National Conference

Photo from StateraConII in Denver, CO. Photo by Malloree Delayne Hill of MDH Photography.

Photo from StateraConII in Denver, CO. Photo by Malloree Delayne Hill of MDH Photography.

Families Welcome

StateraArts is nationally known for taking positive action to bring women* into full and equal participation in the arts. And fulfilling this mission means creating pathways to success and advancement in the arts for caregivers and parents. Statera believes that all professionals with caregiving responsibilities should be treated as artistically viable, professionally capable, and deserving of structural support for access, equal employment, and promotion opportunity.

That is why the Statera National Conference is a families-welcome space! We’re not talking about simply being “family friendly”, we’re talking about proactive access and inclusion for parent artists. Statera’s 4th National Conference is happing October 26-27, 2019 on the campus of City College of New York in Harlem, NYC.

Family Room

This year, we are working in close partnership with the Parent Artist Advocacy League (PAAL) to make sure our parents have what they need at conference. We know that many theatre artists, particularly women, are juggling their professional lives with the needs of their families (we can relate!) To help ensure that you won't need to choose between attending the conference and caring for your little ones, we will have a Family Room** available for any attendees needing to bring their infants or small children with them to conference. This room will be equipped with private space for nursing and pumping and plenty of room for little ones to get the "wiggles" out!

Free to nurse where you like

In addition to full use of our Family Room, anyone attending StateraCon may bring their small children into the sessions with them as they see fit. Also, please feel free to breastfeed in any of the sessions. And if you need to leave the session for any reason, you’re welcome to return at your leisure.

Free to bring another caregiver

We'd like to add that any attendee wishing to bring a babysitter to conference with them to attend to their kiddos while they attend sessions is welcome to do so without registering and paying for their babysitter. Simply note the names of your children and their babysitter when you complete your conference registration and we'll print name badges for your family group so that they have easy access to you during conference.

Alexana Stavros attended Statera’s National Conference in 2016. In the video below, she tells a personal story about attending StateraCon with her baby.

Partnering with PAAL

Looking to coordinate childcare during conference or want to connect with other parents at the conference? Statera and the Parent Artist Advocacy League (PAAL) are here for you you! Please reach out to our liaison Rachel Spencer-Hewitt directly at www.paaltheatre.com/contact for more information. There is also a place in your conference registration form to note your needs. We can’t wait to meet you and your family at StateraConIV in New York City!


*Women: Statera recognizes the limiting nature of the binary use of woman. We serve and welcome anyone on the gender spectrum who identifies either always or some of the time as a woman. We also serve and welcome those who are non-binary.

**The family room will not be staffed by StateraArts personnel and children may not be left unattended at any time.

Sophie Dowllar Ogutu to Receive 2019 Visionary Leadership Award from StateraArts

Sophie Dowllar Ogutu during Statera's 2018 SWAN Day Convening in Milwaukee.

Sophie Dowllar Ogutu during Statera's 2018 SWAN Day Convening in Milwaukee.

StateraArts has named Sophie Dowllar Ogutu as the 2019 recipient of the Martha Richards Visionary Woman in Leadership Award. Sophie is a mother, an unapologetic women's rights defender, a community mobilizer and organizer, and above all - a feminist artist. She is a key coordinator of The 5 C's Theatre Collective, co-founder of the Mamma Africa Community Centre, a board member of the Kenya Community Media Network (KCOMNET), a mentor with the Girl’s Brigade, and the principal organizer for SWAN Day Kenya. Sophie is also an International Committee Member for the World March of Women, which has led to collaborations with the Grassroots Global Justice Alliance and the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa.

This award, established in Martha Richards’ name, is given annually to a visionary woman who uplifts, amplifies, and advances women in the arts. StateraArts established this award to recognize outstanding leaders and support the work of women who are creating pathways for others. StateraArts is honored to highlight the extraordinary achievements of women leaders in the arts who provide powerful role models for mentorship and intersectional equity. The recipient is nominated by the public and chosen by committee. The award comes with international recognition and a $2,000 prize.

StateraArts will officially deliver the award to Sophie Dowllar Ogutu on Sunday, October 27 during a ceremony at Statera’s National Conference in New York City.

FROM SOPHIE:

“I appreciate, value, and respect people, and I love working with everyone. In my art-ivism, I work a lot with diverse communities, a rare opportunity that makes the arts space special and unique. Born and raised in a happy and loving family of 10, we learned to love and cherish any opportunity that comes along the way. I started my art journey as a teen, acting in church. When I graduated from high school in 1995, the first opportunity to prosper in life, was in an arts space. It was a radical, political space, and too much for a young girl, but given my background, I continued to strive. This shaped me and helped me choose the arts path. That opportunity made me who I am today. I continue working with women in arts and will always support wherever I can. The role that arts play as a medium for communication, has enabled me to reach many vulnerable hearts of women seeking ways to share and talk about their plights. Women in the arts remains my number one form of interaction and connection to those many hearts.”

Sophie Dowllar Ogutu   speaking during a human rights march.

Sophie Dowllar Ogutu speaking during a human rights march.

Sophie and Lydiah Dola (far right) with Yasmin Ruvalcaba Saludado and Jane Vogel of Advance Gender Equity in the Arts.

Sophie and Lydiah Dola (far right) with Yasmin Ruvalcaba Saludado and Jane Vogel of Advance Gender Equity in the Arts.

QUOTES FROM SOPHIE’S NOMINATIONS:

“Given the complex reality of gender inequality, factors that render women most liable to discrimination are not always easily identifiable, but through the SWAN platform, Sophie has created panels where women in the arts have talked about their forms of discrimination in their work as women artists, and continue to seek alternatives to those problems / challenges through active participation of women artists.”


“Despite huge personal challenges Sophie has been the driving force behind SWAN day in Kenya for over a decade and shows altruism and compassion in all she does. In a culture steeped in patriarchy and corruption she is a beacon of honesty and courageously stands up for women’s rights in particular through theatre and the arts. She has been working for change ever since I first met her when she was an Amnesty International prisoner of conscience.”


“Everything Sophie does is WOMEN-centered. She introduced international grassroots feminist women to us here in Kenya. She also introduced SWAN Day Festival. She believes in empowering women. She truly is a believer of women's advancement and true empowerment.”


“Sophie gives women the courage to stand for themselves. Networks have been created to ensure that women can not only engage in business but also support one another emotionally and socially. She helps women become a sister's keeper and their wellbeing has become strengthened through this.”


“We have walked the 5Cs journey together and I’ve seen Sophie champion the rights of many. She seizes every opportunity to empower women artists. Now with the SWAN Day platform, we see even more opportunities created through creatives. Sophie is one resilient person.”


“Sophie’s theatre collective, the 5Cs, which is a women led human rights group, is one of the most progressive groups with community social change approaches.”


“I work in a UK university surrounded by inspirational women but Sophie is at an entirely different level.”

“Sophie is a committed feminist in a patriarchal society. We set up Mamma Africa Community Centre as a small charity supporting rural women around Lake Victoria. This gave them access to training to become better at whatever they chose: to learn from agricultural practices, first aid, the arts, or technology. The project has developed based on the analysis that the culturally encouraged lack of confidence in women is what holds women back from developing their potential and that trained women can look at evidence of competence to build their confidence one bit at a time. Sophie has been the driving force.”


“The radical leadership style that Sophie brought, even with a lot of opposition at first, she continued with so much love. She never gave up and has never discriminated against anyone. This has opened up a lot of space for young women and they enjoy being part of the change we all yearn to see.”


“Sophie organizes with so much passion and amazing zeal.”


“The arts community served by Sophie because of her popular progressive theatre for social change. It has positively impacted the lives of many, especially young people, who otherwise are the "forgotten bracket”. She creates community theatre that provokes minds to bring about change.”


“In Kenya ‘pathways’ for the arts do not exist unless you belong to a small group of privileged people. But Sophie creates opportunities to perform and to be recognized and celebrated for your talents.”


“Since 1995, the 5C Human Rights Theatre has been doing progressive, interactive and open participatory theatre pieces for social change.”


“Sophie is selfless in her endeavors to support women all over and empower them to become holistically strong. She has come to the rescue of battered women. She has cried out when human rights activists have been murdered or jailed or gone missing. She is a tower of strength and a beacon of light to many.”

General Registration for Statera National Conference Closes on September 30th

Join us for the Statera National Conference in New York City from October 26-27, 2019. Meet with theatre professionals from all over the country to network, learn, renew, share, and more! StateraCon is all about intersectional gender balance and our goal is to take positive action to bring women* into full and equal participation in the American Theatre. StateraCon is open to all theatre professionals, practitioners, students and enthusiasts regardless of gender or age: administrators, designers, dramaturgs, educators, technicians, actors, advocates, etc.

No need to put on your game face. No need to “gear up”. Statera’s National Conference is a place for collective healing and creative coalition building. We want you to bring your whole self to conference. Yes, there will be strategy sessions, tool-gathering, and networking. Yes, there will be industry panels, touchstone addresses, and breakout sessions. But StateraCon is not your average arts conference. We are shifting the culture from one where myths surrounding lack, competition, and isolation are replaced by authentic experiences of collaboration, connection, and positive action.

DEADLINES TO REMEMBER

September 30, 2019 - General Registration ($300) and Student Registration ($150) closes at midnight EST. We anticipate selling out before then, so register now to secure your spot.

October 1, 2019 - Late Registration ($350) opens until sold out. 

Touchstone speakers: Tony-winner Joanna Gleason (left) and nationally recognized director May Adrales (right).

Touchstone speakers: Tony-winner Joanna Gleason (left) and nationally recognized director May Adrales (right).

TOUCHSTONE SPEAKERS

Joanna Gleason is revered by Broadway audiences for her unforgettable portrayal of The Baker’s Wife in the original company of Into the Woods. Other Broadway credits include Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Nick and Nora, Day in the Death of Joe Egg, and Sons of The Prophet among others. Her extensive film and TV work includes Boogie Nights, Crimes & Misdemeanors, Hannah and Her Sisters, Mr. Holland’s Opus, The Wedding Planner, The West Wing, ER, The Good Wife, and a host of other projects. Joanna has been teaching in high schools and colleges around the country for thirty years, and has directed Off-Broadway as well as for television. More information HERE.

May Adrales, a director, teacher and arts leader. May helmed the world premiere of Lortel Award and Obie Award-Winning production VIETGONE at Manhattan Theatre Club/ South Coast Rep, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and Seattle Rep. She has just been named the Associate Artistic Director of Milwaukee Rep. May served as Director of On Site Programming at the Lark Play Development Center (2008-2010), developing programs to support and nurture over 200 playwrights. She served as an Artistic Associate at The Public Theater (2006-2009), spearheading the Shakespeare Lab, a professional conservatory, and overseeing community engagement programs in the outer boroughs. Adrales is the recipient of the TCG Alan Schneider Directing Award; Stage Directors and Choreographers Foundation’s inaugural Denham Fellowship and the Paul Green Emerging Directing award. She is a recipient of a TCG New Generations grant. She has been awarded directing fellowships at New York Theater Workshop; Women's Project; SoHo Rep; and The Drama League. She has directed and taught at NYU, Juilliard, American Conservatory Theater, American Repertory Theater, Fordham University and Bard College.

From StateraCon 2018 (left to right): Christine Jugueta, Maggie Rogers, Sage Martin, Lydiah Dola.

From StateraCon 2018 (left to right): Christine Jugueta, Maggie Rogers, Sage Martin, Lydiah Dola.

Register Today

StateraArts is proud to partner this year with City College of New York and the Department of Theatre and Speech (CCNY) for our fourth international conference. The theme for StateraConIV is Coalition Building.

StateraCon is open to everyone. We invite and welcome all gender identities, all races and ethnicities, all religions and creeds, countries of origin, all immigrants and refugees, all abilities and disabilities, and all sexual orientations. Everyone is welcome here. 

See the full speaker line-up >>>

See the full conference schedule >>>

Registration includes access to all Statera Conference programming. This includes touchstone addresses, plenaries, workshops, breakout sessions, panel discussions, admission to organized social gatherings, and a conference swag bag. General Registration ($300) is available until September 30th or until we sell out. Remember that Statera Members receive the early bird rate ($250) as long as registration is open. Please read the StateraCon Refund & Cancellation Policies before registering.


*A NOTE ON INCLUSION AT STATERA

Women: Statera recognizes the limiting nature of the binary use of woman. We serve and welcome anyone on the gender spectrum who identifies either always or some of the time as a woman. We also serve and welcome those who identify as non-binary. 

Intersectionality: StateraArts works through an intersectional lens for gender parity. We understand and acknowledge that systems of oppression and discrimination are interdependent and span all social categorizations such as race, class, gender, ability, religion, parental status, size, age, and sexual orientation as they apply to a given individual or group. Addressing one spoke of systematic discrimination or disadvantage means holistically addressing them all. 

Statera Celebrates Successful $25K Fundraising Match

ThankYouStar.png

StateraArts is celebrating this week, because YOU helped us reach our fundraising goal of $25,000! Deep gratitude goes out to all of our volunteers, our incredible donors, and to everyone who participated in our #WhyDoYouStatera campaign.

Also, a huge thank you to Torie Wiggins, Vanessa DeSilvio, Chris Sanders, Valerie Rachelle, Brenda Jean Foley, Maggie Rogers, Jackie Vanderbeck, and Kelcey Anyá who participated in our Statera Community Conversation series. You have our thanks and our deepest admiration.

And thank you to our indefatigable champion Martha Richards of WomenArts who matched your donations dollar for dollar, bringing Statera’s fundraising total to $50,000. Nonprofit fundraising can be a serious slog, but you - our incredible community - make this work so meaningful and gratifying. This has been a humbling and powerful campaign. Thank you for fitting social change into your budget and for choosing to make StateraArts your home. We are so glad you’re here.

#WhyDoYouStatera continues!

Lormarev Jones.png
Geoffrey Kent.png
Lydiah Dola.png
Sarah Hollis.png
Nataki Garrett.png
Jessica Cavanah.png
Joel Ferrel.png
Maggie Rogers.png

Join Broadway and TV Stars for "Changemakers" Fundraiser Benefiting StateraArts Mentorship

“Changemakers” features Amanda Green (left) and is hosted by Dale Soules (right)

“Changemakers” features Amanda Green (left) and is hosted by Dale Soules (right)

Did you know that last year only 17% of creative leadership roles on Broadway were held by women? To help change the stage, The Green Room 42 presents Changemakers: A Celebration of Women and StateraArts on Thursday, August, 22nd at 7 PM. Join veterans from Broadway, Television, and Film for tales of sisterhood, challenges in the workplace, and overcoming adversity.

The evening will uplift, amplify, and advance women* artists, featuring Tony-nominated Lyricist/Composer and award-winning performer Amanda Green (“Hands on a Hardbody”). Broadway veteran and three-time SAG Award winner Dale Soules, widely-known as inmate Frieda Berlin on “Orange Is The New Black”, will host. There will also be a panel talk led by Rachel Spencer Hewitt, founder of the Parent Artist Advocacy League. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the StateraArts Mentorship. StateraArts is a national organization that brings women into full and equal participation in the arts.

The evening is Directed and Produced by Mara Jill Herman with Assistant Direction by Ashley Ruth Jones and Music Direction by Julianne B Merrill. Below you’ll find a list of the incredible line-up of performers for “Changemakers”.

Emily Borromeo

Emily Borromeo

Andrea Presinario

Andrea Presinario

Aurelia Williams

Aurelia Williams

Caitlin McKechney

Caitlin McKechney

Gina Naomi Baez

Gina Naomi Baez

Carly Kincannon

Carly Kincannon

Amanda Lea LaVergne

Amanda Lea LaVergne

Hannah Rose

Hannah Rose

Ashley Ruth Jones

Ashley Ruth Jones

Liisi LaFontaine

Liisi LaFontaine

Ilana Levine

Ilana Levine

Kara Lindsay

Kara Lindsay

Lianah Sta. Ana

Lianah Sta. Ana

Meredith Beck

Meredith Beck

Jennifer Lorae

Jennifer Lorae

Annemarie Rosano

Annemarie Rosano

Rosa Avila

Rosa Avila

Alison Lea Bender

Alison Lea Bender

Kristine Reese

Kristine Reese

Sarah Stevens

Sarah Stevens

Janice Landry

Janice Landry

Rachel Spencer Hewitt

Rachel Spencer Hewitt

Mara Jill Herman

Mara Jill Herman

Julianne B. Merrill

Julianne B. Merrill

For a little more information about the evening, StateraArts spoke with director Mara Jill Herman.

StateraArts: First of all, thank you for hosting this amazing event in honor of StateraArts Mentorship! Why is arts advocacy such an important part of your work as an individual artist? 

Mara Jill Herman: I can’t remember a time in my life without the arts. I’ve spent a great deal of my career on stage but I also find great joy in outreach. One of my passions is to bring smart, creative, and generous people together in a room. The arts provided me with direction, purpose, and a sense of identity that ultimately shaped who I am today. When those in power threaten to eliminate arts funding and programming, they send a message to all artists that we don’t matter. But we cannot compromise the human experience and erase a future generation of makers. Art is meant to challenge. It is meant to stimulate invigorating conversation and connect people.  

SA: Tell us about your upcoming fundraiser: "Changemakers."

MJH: In 2018, I was deeply charged by Women’s Day On Broadway and wrote about it for OnStage Blog. I learned that nearly 70% of Broadway audiences are made up of female-identifying patrons but only 17% of those productions have women at the helm. This statistic shocked and ignited me. The Women’s Day symposium and more recently, Rachel Chavkin’s 2019 Tony winning speech for Best Director, are among the driving forces behind “Changemakers.” I admire those who seek change and do not accept the status quo. Women who take action and use their platform to advocate for greater representation both on and off the stage are among those to be featured in this event.

There will be never-told-before tales of sisterhood, mentorship, challenges, and overcoming adversity. These personal stories will lead into songs crossing various musical genres. We’ve got pop, folk, some musical theater, original songs, and even a Celtic trio! I’m also very jazzed that actor, activist, and mother, Rachel Spencer Hewitt, will lead a panel talk on the Parent Artist Advocacy League, an organization she founded that creates family-friendly practices in the theater. And Ms. Hewitt will engage in dialogue with some surprise guests! 

SA: Tell us about a defining moment in your arts career when you felt supported and uplifted. 

MJH: I’ve had several defining moments in my early arts career: acting in musicals at French Woods Festival of the Performing Arts, earning recognition by the National YoungArts Foundation, and getting thrown on mid-show as an understudy in Nerds at Philadelphia Theater Company. However, the recent catalyst for forging forward as a producer is my participation in America’s Sweethearts. This tight-knit group of supportive women motivates me and holds me accountable without a shred of competition. Our boss, Carly Kincannon, who will appear on the 22nd, also facilitated a residency at one of New York’s hottest entertainment venues, The Green Room 42. And that is where I produced my first benefit Stronger Than Hate, A Benefit for Tree Of Life Synagogue.

SA: Tell us a little more about the lineup for the evening.

MJH: The lineup is an embarrassment of riches! Tony-nominated Lyricist/Composer and award-winning performer Amanda Green (Hands on a Hardbody) will appear and three-time SAG Award winner Dale Soules, widely-known as inmate Frieda Berlin on Orange Is The New Black, will host. The diverse cast includes: Lianah Sta. Ana (Miss Saigon), Gina Naomi Baez (She's Gotta Have It), Alison Lea Bender (We So Hapa), Emily Borromeo (Broadway Bounty Hunter), Galway Girls (feat. Meredith Beck, Janice Landry, Caitlin McKechney), Carly Kincannon (America's Sweethearts), Liisi LaFontaine (Dreamgirls), Kara Lindsay (Newsies), Jennifer Lorae (Hard Times), Andrea Prestinario (Side Show, Jeff Award), Kristine Reese (Finding Neverland), Hannah Rose (Olay Live!), Talia Suskauer (Be More Chill), America's Sweethearts (feat. Amanda Lea LaVergne, Annemarie Rosano, Sarah Stevens), and Aurelia Williams (Once On This Island).

Equity News September 2015

Equity News September 2015

SA: With so many organizations our there, why did you chose StateraArts as the beneficiary of Changemakers? 

MJH: I met Melinda Pfundstein at the Utah Shakespeare Festival in 2005. She was a well-established leading lady, and I really looked up to her. Years later, I saw her photo with Kate Shindle on the cover of Equity’s newsletter, and the national impact of StateraArts set in. In 2016, I joined Statera’s pilot mentorship program and found it so rewarding to mentor an early-career individual. The word Statera, stemming from the Latin word for balance, also resonates with me. There are so many women in the Statera community who thrive in their professional lives but also create and nurture families of their own. I aspire to be one of them.

Graphic Design by Brittney Keim.

Graphic Design by Brittney Keim.

Don’t miss Changemakers: A Celebration of Women and StateraArts on Thursday, August 22nd at 7PM. You can purchase tickets HERE.  *Those who can't make it but want to donate to the event are invited to contact Mara Jill Herman: mara@marajillherman.com.

 

Digging Deeper: Artistic Directors Hiring Women Behind the Scenes

Valerie Rachelle Banner.png

As part of Statera's midyear giving campaign, we're publishing a series of deep-dive conversations centered around community, purpose, advocacy, and action. We are asking members of our community to share their “why” with us. In this video, director, choreographer, and artistic director of the Oregon Cabaret Theatre, Valerie Rachelle, reveals her early trials as a freelancer and shares her thoughts on gender equity in hiring practices.

In addition to her work as a director and arts leader, Valerie is part of the founding team for the Southern Oregon Chapter of Statera Mentrorship, launching in the winter of 2020.

More about the Oregon Cabaret Theatre >>>

Did you catch our previous Statera Community Conversations?

Statera Members will also have early access to two additional Statera Community Conversations in the coming weeks:

  • "Fat Discrimination in the Arts: Societal Obsession with Smallness" a conversation with Maggie Rogers

  • "We're Ready for New Narratives: Black Women in Media" a conversation with Chris Sanders

Questioning Authority: the glorification of politeness as a means of controlling women

Jackie Vanderbeck Statera Commuity Conversation.jpeg

As part of Statera's midyear giving campaign, we're publishing a series of deep-dive conversations centered around community, purpose, advocacy, and action. We are asking members of our community to share their “why” with us. In this video, actor and writer Jackie Vanderbeck shares her thoughts on overcoming early negative messaging, the process of claiming personal agency in spaces where there is a power imbalance, and empowering others to do the same.

In addition to her work as an actor and writer, Jackie is also the founding Artistic Director of Sing For Your Seniors. Jackie has been a member of the Statera Community since October 2016 when she attended Statera’s National Conference in Denver, CO. Jackie is a Statera Ambassador as well as a Statera Member.

Read more about Jackie >>>

Did you catch our previous Statera Community Conversations?

The conversation continues in the coming weeks. Next up?

  • "Digging Deeper: Artistic Directors Hiring Women Behind the Scenes" a conversation with Valerie Rachelle

Statera Members will also have early access to two additional Statera Community Conversations:

  • "Fat Discrimination in the Arts: Societal Obsession with Smallness" a conversation with Maggie Rogers

  • "We're Ready for New Narratives: Black Women in Media" a conversation with Chris Sanders

10 More Days to Reach $25,000

As of this afternoon, the Statera community has raised almost $20,000 towards our $25K goal! Thank you to everyone who has contributed! Statera’s midyear giving campaign ends on August 15th, and we need your help.

Most of Statera’s work for gender parity and equity in the arts is done through volunteer hours, innovative grassroots movement, and sheer will. But its also achieved by individual donations big and small.

We’re thrilled that Martha Richards of WomenArts has come forward with a $25,000 matching gift as part of our mid-year giving campaign. This is an enormous opportunity for StateraArts to renew our dynamic programming, dig deeper, and continue providing pathways forward for women* in the arts.

We can’t do it without you.

We have ten more days to meet our $25,000 goal. Let’s do it! Give $5. Give $10. Give what you can. No gift is too small. Every dollar will be matched. Whatever your reason, now is the time to contribute at www.stateraarts.org/donate.

#WhyDoYouStatera

Nataki Garrett.png
TIFFANY DENISE HOBBS.png
Tira Palmquist.png
Vanessa DeSilvio.png
Malini Singh McDonald.png
Joel Ferrel.png
Jason Spelbring.png
Lormarev Jones.png

Transforming Negative Messaging Through Collaboration

Photo by Mikki Schaffner

Photo by Mikki Schaffner

As part of Statera's midyear giving campaign, we're publishing a series of deep-dive conversations centered around community, purpose, advocacy, and action. We are asking members of our community to share their “why” with us. In this video, actor and choreographer Kelcey Anyá shares her thoughts about how she overcame negative messaging early in her career through collaboration and a willingness to try new things.

Kelcey has been a member of the Statera Community since October 2018 when she attended Statera’s National Conference in Milwaukee. In addition to her work as a performer and choreographer, Kelcey is also a mentee in the Statera Mentorship NYC Chapter.

Did you catch last week’s conversation?

The conversation continues in the coming weeks. Next up?

  • "Questioning Authority: the Glorification of Politeness as a Means of Controlling Women" a conversation with Jackie Vanderbeck

  • "Digging Deeper: Artistic Directors Hiring Women Behind the Scenes" a conversation with Valerie Rachelle

Statera Members will also have access to two additional Statera Community Conversations:

  • "Fat Discrimination in the Arts: Societal Obsession with Smallness" a conversation with Maggie Rogers

  • "We're Ready for New Narratives: Black Women in Media" a conversation with Chris Sanders

Announcing the 2019 StateraCon Grant Recipients

43314879_1934244646656065_1413685951447695360_n+copy.jpg

On behalf of the entire StateraArts team, thank you to everyone who applied for a 2019 grant or made an award nomination! The volume of applications received this year clearly illustrates the continued critical need for artist funding and resources. For this reason, StateraArts remains committed to making our awards accessible to all artists through a free, open call for submissions.

We’re thrilled to share that this year, StateraArts awarded $9320 in funding directly to artists and arts organizations. Below you’ll find the names of of 2019 StateraCon grant recipients. For a full list of 2019 grant and award recipients and to find the latest information on Statera opportunities and grants, please visit www.stateraarts.org/grants-awards

2019 STATERA NATIONAL CONFERENCE TRAVEL GRANTS

Alejandra Luna
Chris Sanders
Tia Laulusa
TBA - stay tuned


2019 STATERA NATIONAL CONFERENCE TUITION GRANTS

Adriana Gaviria
Alejandra Luna
Christine Bruno
Clare Brennan
Jeanine Robinson
Woodzick
Kelcey A Broomfield
Kelly Ground
Lisa Wolpe
Lori DeLappe-Grondin
Lormarev Jones
Maizy Broderick Scarpa
Maleni Chaitoo
Michaela Goldhaber
Patricia Noonan
Suellen da Costa Coelho
Susan Young Keels
Tia Laulusa
TBA - recipient has been notified, but not yet accepted
TBA - recipient has been notified, but not yet accepted

Statera Member Spotlight: Malini Singh McDonald

StateraArts members come from all over the USA and all genres of art-making. They are educators, arts leaders, activists, content-creators, professional artists, early career, mid-career, patrons, and community organizers. The Statera Member Spotlight is just one way StateraArts uplifts and amplifies the voices of our members. Today, we’d like to introduce you to Malini Singh McDonald.

Malini.jpg

STATERA: What inspires your work most?
MALINI SINGH McDONALD:
Other people. One of the great opportunities I have with Theatre Beyond Broadway is that I'm aware of who is creating. And I have to tell you, being able to see what other people are doing at all levels (when it’s very green; in the early stage of their development; a complete rewrite or reworking of a piece; all of it) and the fact that we are all willing to keep creating, inspires me. Also, whenever someone has a desire to create something and I'm able to have a hand in making that come through, it fulfills me. I always tell people, "if you have a dream go after it!" You can. Dreams do come true. You just have to have a clear path about what you're going to do to achieve them.

SA: What is your occupation or calling in the arts?
MSM:
I am a director, producer, and publicist.

SA: What organizations are you affiliated with?
MSM:
Co-VP of Communications for the League of Professional Theatre Women, a member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society, the Associate Producer for the Broadway Artist Connection, producing partner for The Anthropologists, and a member of StateraArts! 

SA: Tell us about your favorite project you've done thus far.
MSM:
That's hard! Recently I directed The Wiz in Liberia, West Africa with a group of young people (Matsiko World Choir) who had never done theatre. They've never seen it or performed it. They definitely had experience singing in front of crowds but that is a different platform. It was definitely a teaching opportunity. It was also difficult because we were only there for twelve days and The Wiz is not an easy show! The luxuries we have in NYC isn’t quite available. You can't simply run down the road to grab a prop or call your theatre connections to ask for glow tape. It was literally, "What do we have at hand and what can we do with it?". But it was magical because we had 42 kids performing and 8 on the production team and to get to see 50 kids' eyes light up and the theatre bug bite them, it's inexpressible. Theatre is lives in all of us. The desire for acceptance and validation is universal. Watching them take in the fact that they made this from scratch (we let them create the set), and to hear the applause they received was inspiring.

SA: Why did you become a STATERA member?
MSM:
There's something fiery about how you inspire and talk about artists of all backgrounds. I often wonder, "Are we creating a bigger conversation or just talking amongst ourselves?" We could all sit in someone’s living room and talk about the woes of the world for hours, but what action are we taking? Statera is fueling that action. The way Statera builds opportunity is so important. StateraCon is also really exciting to me - to get to see what other women are doing. I'm at a place in my career where I don't need to do things just to do them. Being in action is really important to me. However I show up, I want to make sure I'm making a change, a difference, being a voice for someone who doesn't have a voice yet. I can do that. I also have a ridiculous circle of warrior women (and men) who are my sisters and brothers in arms. The women I surround myself with are fire-starters. I'm looking forward to making more of these connections through Statera.

SA: Any upcoming projects you'd like to share with us?
MSM:
I'm producing the Cherry Orchard at Dixon Place at the end of this year, and am on the team for Chasing Rainbows at Paper Mill Playhouse. I always try to have a commercial project and an indie project on my docket together!

SA: Tell us about another woman or non-binary artist who inspires your work.
MSM:
Marina Abramovic is someone I'm kind of obsessed with. It feels like she is doing what I don't have the guts to do. She’s the person who I think "Okay, wow you are truly an artist. You are breaking boundaries." I think at times I channel a little bit of that energy, but never completely. Not to that extent.

SA: Mentorship is at the core of the STATERA mission. Tell us about one of your mentors. How did they shape you or provide pathways for opportunity?
MSM:
My mentor is my professor from undergrad, Eleanor. I've known her since I was 18. She embodies everything I want to be. She is strong woman, clear about what she wants, and clear about her needs. That attracted so many of us to want to be under her tutelage. Eleanor taught us that we had to learn every aspect of the theatre, respect everyone on the team, that not one artist was better than the other because of "title". Her casts were diverse regardless of the time period of a production. As a result, we all had a chance to perform in classics, musicals, etc. She's the one who said to me, "Malini, why don't you direct?". She's my biggest fan, and I still see her often. There's yet to be a show where I didn't have a conversation with her first. Eleanor is always so proud of me. I can tell. This industry is difficult for someone who looks like me. It didn't come easily for her either. She lived and worked in the midst of the theatre community here in New York City in the 1970s and so forth, and while she was perfectly qualified, she never directed on Broadway, like she'd dreamed. There weren't many women being given that opportunity then. She’s been a happy retiree, still teaching and still inspiring me. I hope I am carrying that fire.


ABOUT MALINI

MALINI SINGH MCDONALD is a native New Yorker who has been involved in the arts for her entire life. She received her BA in Theatre Arts and English Literature from Baruch College and her MFA in Directing from the Actors Studio Drama School. Select theatre credits include the upcoming Chasing Rainbow (Paper Mill Playhouse), the revival of Godspell (Producer, Broadway Revival); The Year of Living Dangerously (Publicist, 54 Below); Whiskey Pants: The Mayor of Williamsburg (Publicist, HERE Arts Center); From Ship to Shape (Publicist, Winner of Two United Solo Awards); The Eternal Space (Associate Producer & Marketing Director, Theatre Row); The Wiz (Director, Matsiko World Orphan Choir, Liberia); Torch Song Trilogy (Director, ATA); Hamlet: The Viking Prince of Denmark (Producer, Black Henna Productions). Malini is also the founder of Theatre Beyond Broadway which provides a platform to promote and support independent artists. Malini is the Co-VP of Communications for the League of Professional Theatre Women, a member of the Stage Directors and Choreographers Society, the Associate Producer for the Broadway Artist Connection, producing partner for The Anthropologists, and a member of StateraArts. Malini has been recognized for her role in the community with the Woman of Distinction Award for her contribution to Media, Arts and Culture from the City of New York. www.malinism.com and www.theatrebeyondbroadway.com.

International Mother Artist Day is August 2nd

intl-mother-artist-day.png

Mark your calendars and get ready to celebrate! International Mother Artist Day is Friday, August 2nd! Originally founded by the Parent Artist Advocacy League (PAAL) and the Philadelphia Women’s Theatre Festival (PWTF), International Mother Artis Day is a time to celebrate and support mother artists everywhere!

In a recent PAAL blog post, Executive Director Rachel Spencer Hewitt says, “The goal of International Mother Artists Day is to form community and find strength in relationship. We network to increase opportunity and gather resources, and from those joys we can create art, opportunity, and supportive solutions.”

Origins of International Mother Artist Day

In 2018, the PAAL joined forces with the Philadelphia Women’s Theatre Festival for the first Motherhood Reading Festival, which featured four days of four mother directors, four mother playwrights, themes that integrated motherhood, and theatre programming for children on-site simultaneously with the reading series for parents to be able to attend with their families.

During the 2018 festival brainstorming sessions, one of the initiatives floated was “International Mother Artist Day,” where the hashtag #intlmotherartistday was used across the world on social media to celebrate the mother artists we are, the mother artists we know, and/or the mother artists who inspire us – all on one, explosive, empowering, and united thread.

More about Philadelphia Women’s Theatre Festival

The 2019 Philadelphia Women’s Theatre Festival is happening August 1-4 at the Arden Theatre Company at the Hamilton Family Arts Center. PWTF fosters and encourages women in the performing arts by offering unique opportunities for exposure, professional, artistic and personal development and a platform for performance. For the full schedule, please visit www.phillywomenstheatrefest.org/2019-festival.

Get Involved!

Join PAAL, PWTF, StateraArts, and countless other arts organizations on InstagramFacebook, and/or Twitter by celebrating yourself, a mother artist you know, and/or a mother artist who inspires you! We’d also love to know your insight as an ally or parent to the reality of being a mother artist. Thank you for supporting parents, for celebrating with us, and for looking out for ways to change the way the world for the better for mother artists everywhere. See you there!

 
CLICK THIS IMAGE TO REPOST AND SPREAD THE WORD!

CLICK THIS IMAGE TO REPOST AND SPREAD THE WORD!

 

 To tag and get a repost, copy+paste and include this line for Instagram:
#intlmotherartistday @paaltheatre @phillywomenstheatrefest

To tag and get a retweet, copy+paste and include this line for Twitter:
#intlmotherartistday @paaltheatre @womensthtrfest

To tag and get a share, copy+paste and include this line for Facebook:
#intlmotherartistday @paaltheatre @philadelphiawomenstheatrefest

Representation and Mentorship in the Arts: You Are Not Alone

WigginsConversationBanner.jpg

As part of Statera's midyear giving campaign, we're publishing a series of deep-dive conversations centered around community, purpose, advocacy, and action. We are asking members of our community to share their “why” with us. In this video, actor and educator Torie Wiggins shares her thoughts about isolation, mentorship, the need for connection, academia, professional theatre, and her feelings on the word "diversity".

Torie has been a member of the Statera Community since October 2018 when she presented a breakout session at Statera’s National Conference in Milwaukee called "The Magic Stands Alone: The Importance of Solo Performance for Women in Theatre". In addition to her work as an actor and professor, Torie is also a mentor to many early career artists and an advocate for women in the arts. You can read her full bio HERE.

The conversation continues in the coming weeks. Next up?

  • "Questioning Authority: the Glorification of Politeness as a Means of Controlling Women" a conversation with Jackie Vanderbeck

  • "Digging Deeper: Artistic Directors Hiring Women Behind the Scenes" a conversation with Valerie Rachelle

  • "Transforming Negative Messaging Through Collaboration" a conversation with Kelcey Anyá

Statera Members will also have access to two additional Statera Community Conversations:

  • "Fat Discrimination in the Arts: Societal Obsession with Smallness" a conversation with Maggie Rogers

  • "We're Ready for New Narratives: Black Women in Media" a conversation with Chris Sanders

Our Goal: 1000 Donors Strong

StateraArts is moving mountains. In our first four years we have:

  • Hosted 3 national conferences

  • Launched 12 Mentorship Chapters nationwide, with 10 in development for 2020

  • Matched over 450 mentors and mentees

  • Hosted International SWAN Day 2019 with events in 36 countries

  • Awarded $8,650 in support grants for women artists

  • Hosted a living resource directory

Most of our work for gender parity and equity in the arts is done through volunteer hours, innovative grassroots movement, and sheer will. But its also achieved by individual donations big and small.

We’re thrilled that Martha Richards of WomenArts has come forward with a $25,000 matching gift as part of our mid-year giving campaign. This is an enormous opportunity for StateraArts to renew our dynamic programming, dig deeper, and continue providing pathways forward for women* in the arts. We need your help now.

The StateraArts community is a force of nature, consisting of thousands of artists and arts leaders nationwide. Whether you're donating because of our national mentorship program, our incredible conferences, our free resource directory, our membership program, our workshops on radical inclusion, our curated industry information on social media, International SWAN Day, or our advocacy work for equal pay and access for women and non-binary artists, your donation will be matched, dollar for dollar!

If 1,000 people donate $25 each by August 15th, we'll easily meet our goal!
Whatever your reason, now is the time to contribute at 
www.stateraarts.org/donate.

#WhyDoYouStatera

Sarah Hollis.png
Kate Mueth.png
Doug Scholz-Carlson.png
Valerie Rachelle.png
MarthaRichards.png
Sabrina Cofield.png
Torie Wiggins.png
Polly Firestone Walker.png

*A NOTE ON INCLUSION AT STATERA

Women: Statera recognizes the limiting nature of the binary use of woman. We serve and welcome anyone on the gender spectrum who identifies either always or some of the time as a woman. We also serve and welcome those who identify as non-binary. 

Intersectionality: StateraArts works through an intersectional lens for gender parity. We understand and acknowledge that systems of oppression and discrimination are interdependent and span all social categorizations such as race, class, gender, ability, religion, parental status, size, age, and sexual orientation as they apply to a given individual or group. Addressing one spoke of systematic discrimination or disadvantage means holistically addressing them all. 

Why Do You Statera?

MatchGiftHeader.png

Dear Statera Community,

I Statera. The verb. I am Statera. I am balance, yes. But I also create balance. I build pathways. I am a pathway. I disrupt oppressive systems. I innovate solutions. Yes, I take up space and hold the door open for those behind me, but I also kick the door down for women around me to do the same. For me. For you. For longevity and relevance of the arts, which I love. For my three daughters.

#WhyDoYouStatera?

We are asking the growing Statera community to share about what it means to be a woman today. What messages do you receive about being a woman. About women around you? How do you disrupt oppressive systems?

Common themes arise. Whether told directly or implied, the message has been that women must play small, be quiet, and compete for space and opportunity. The result? A common feeling of being alone in the journey.

We believe that isolation is a lie. Statera consciously chooses community and collaboration over competition. We actively create pathways for women artists to advancement and full participation in the arts.

Today we launch our second $25,000 matching gift campaign thanks to the trust and generosity of Martha Richards and WomenArts. Every dollar is doubled. Every dollar counts.

Three ways to give.
100% of all donations directly serve Statera programs:

  1. Visit StateraArts on Facebook

  2. Visit our website at www.stateraarts.org/donate

  3. Send a check to:
    StateraArts
    755 S. Main St., Ste. 4 #281
    Cedar City, UT 84720

Isolation is a lie. We invite you to help us prove it.

Yours in Statera, (balance)

unnamed-1.png
 

Melinda (she/her)
Executive Director


Supporting and donating to StateraArts is deeply personal. We all have our reasons for being a part of the Statera community. This summer, we’re asking that you share your “why” with us. Why are you an agent of change in the gender parity movement? Tell us why you support StateraArts. What about the Statera community feeds your soul? Why does gender equity in the arts matter to you? Why Do You Statera?

Share your story on social media using #WhyDoYouStatera.

Share a photo on social media of you and your work
in the arts with a story using #WhyDoYouStatera.

Joanna Gleason.png
Screen Shot 2019-07-15 at 6.34.36 AM.png
MarthaWhyDoIStatera.png
ChrisSanders.png
Torie Wiggins.png
Kate Mueth.png

Highlights of Statera at Andromeda's Sisters Arts Advocacy Gala

StateraArts believes in collaboration over competition and we actively seek opportunities to partner with organizations that are creating pathways for advancement for women in the arts.

Last weekend StateraArts joined The Neo-Political Cowgirls (NPC) theatre collective at the historic John Drew theatre at Guild Hall in East Hampton, New York for the final day of their annual Andromeda’s Sisters Arts & Advocacy Gala. The incredible people behind NPC are doing such exciting and important work to create gender balance in arts on Long Island. The StateraArts team was honored to participate.

During our time at Andromeda’s Sisters, Statera’s Operations Director Sarah Greenman, facilitated a creative writing and advocacy workshop which was attended by local artists, writers, activists, community partners, and philanthropists. Greenman was also interviewed by NPC’s Artistic Director, Kate Mueth, followed by a Q & A with attendees.

Thank you to Kate Mueth and the Neo-Political Cowgirls for inviting StateraArts to facilitate Day 2 of Andromeda’s Sisters! Below, you’ll find some snapshots from the event.

Statera workshop participants on Day 2 of Andromeda’s Sisters.

Statera workshop participants on Day 2 of Andromeda’s Sisters.

Statera workshop participants share their writing.

Statera workshop participants share their writing.

Blythe Danner during a play reading on Day 1.

Blythe Danner during a play reading on Day 1.

Laura Gomez during a play reading on Day 1.

Laura Gomez during a play reading on Day 1.

Workshop participants on Day 2.

Workshop participants on Day 2.

Sarah Greenman (left) and Kate Mueth (right).

Sarah Greenman (left) and Kate Mueth (right).